Learning Your Limits: How to Adjust Your Movements to Avoid Injury

by Barry Hill
Learning Your Limits: How to Adjust Your Movements to Avoid Injury

We may be aging, but we’re certainly not delusional; most of us are aware that we’re no longer the ‘spring chickens’ we were in our youth, and now we have to be careful as we move. This is especially true after a long period of sedentary lifestyle, since our bodies are not conditioned for movement.

The key to starting a new exercise regimen in your years after age fifty is to learn and know your limits. Here are some tips to adjust your movements to avoid injury:

  • Start Slow. It’s never a good idea to jump into a new regimen without thoughtful planning. This is why it’s a good idea to use a personal trainer to professionally advise on how you should proceed. Whether you use a personal trainer or not, go into your workouts slowly, and build up the weight, repetitions, speed, endurance, etc.
  • Be Mindful. As you move, you should always pay attention to your body, and respond to what it’s telling you. If you feel tight in an area, slowly stretch it out. If something hurts sharply or in a way that doesn’t feel like normal resistance, stop what you are doing, ice the area, stretch/massage, and give it time to recover. If the pain persists, see a doctor.
  • Focus on Flexibility. One of the most frustrating effects of aging is a loss of limber movement. One way you can keep injury away and help improve your range of motion is to stretch and do exercises that promote flexibility.
  • Always Stretch. Since your aging body is naturally less flexible and limber, it’s more and more important to properly warm up and cool down from your workouts with full stretching. Don’t skip this important part! Good stretching habits will keep muscles from becoming too tight, which can lead to muscular injury.

It’s great that you’re excited about getting fit and enjoying the benefits of a fit, healthy life; just do so safely!

Featured photo source: Pixabay.com

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